CakePHP

Title CakePHP
Defnition Cake, if I recall correctly, was one of the first PHP frameworks around back when spaghetti code was standard. The idea behind Cake was to make developing applications fast (ie, “convention over configuration”) by cutting down on how much code the developer needed to write. Less time working means more time making money.
Pros Built-in ORM which I’ve always really enjoyed. I really like how the results are in $post[‘Post’][‘field’] format. Building queries is really simple and you can fetch (for example) a blog post and all of its comments in one or two lines of code.
Reverse routing. This makes maintaining links in an application so much easier. This means if you change a controller’s name at some point, instead of search/replacing 200 instances of “admin/foo” with the new “admin/bar” (and hoping you didn’t miss one) you simply update the route in one place. Any links using the reverse route array will automatically point to the right spot at runtime.
Big community. Because Cake had been around so long you can find the answer for pretty much any question you come up with. If you can’t? They have their own website where you can submit questions, as well as (I believe) a mailing list.
Plugins. This makes re-using code super simple and help keep the app folder clean (if, for example, you are distributing an app that uses modules).
Cons Incredibly slow. Recent versions of Cake (2.2.x as of this post) are much faster and more efficient than previous versions, but it is still one of the slowest frameworks. I am personally not sure how well it holds up when an app of it gets slammed with tons of hits. I am aware that Mozilla’s plugin site runs on an (old) version of Cake, as does Cake’s own bakery and Q&A sites, which all seem to run fine. I suspect it’s a balance between caching and server fine-tuning.
TONS of lines of code. Some developers don’t care what’s going on under the hood; I like to be able to quickly find out how/why something works the way it does. The code is well documented but there’s just so much of it it can be overwhelming.
Occasionally, you need to use code to reign in just how much it does. For example, my first step is to open my AppModel and set $recursive = -1 and adding Containable to Behaviors to prevent it from auto-grabbing related models and letting me tell it what I need.
Autoloading can be awkward. In recent versions of Cake they’ve introduced lazy loading in the form of App::uses. Then, if you need to have access to (for example) the Model class, you do something like App::users(‘Model’, ‘Data/Model’) at the top of the file. This is, IMO, clumsy and no better than doing a require CORE_PATH.’Data/Model/Model.php’;
Conclusion Personally, I use Cake if I need to put together a dynamic site quickly that I don’t foresee getting a lot of hits (like for a local restaurant, for example).

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